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North American Indians - A Cry From The Earth: Music Of The North American Indians album mp3

North American Indians - A Cry From The Earth: Music Of The North American Indians album mp3

Performer: North American Indians
Title: A Cry From The Earth: Music Of The North American Indians
Released: 1979
Country: US
Style: Aboriginal
Category: Country, Folk
Album rating: 4.9
Votes: 639
Size MP3: 1182 mb
Size FLAC: 1212 mb
Size WMA: 1605 mb
Other formats: AAC MPC MP4 AUD AC3 WMA VOC

Tracklist

Musical Styles
Northwest Coast And Eskimo
A1 Tlingit* Paddling Song
A2 Kwakiuti* Raven Song
A3 Copper Eskimo* To Quiet A Raging Storm
A4 Alaskan Eskimo* It Was A Very Lovely Day When The Water Was Calm
Navajo And Great Basin
A5 Navajo A Dance Song Of The Night Chant
A6 Arapaho Father, Have Pity On Me (Arapaho Ghost Dance)
A7 Comanche Yellow Light From Sun Is Streaming (Comanche Ghost Dance)
Pueblo And Yuman
A8 Hopi Sleep Song
A9 Diegueño* A Song Of The Wildcat Dance
Plains
A10 Chippewa* One Wind
A11 Pan-Indian* Modern Love Song
Eastern Woodlands
A12 Iroquois A Song Of The Drum Dance
A13 Choctaw Pleasure Dance
A14 Penobscot Dance Song
Music In Culture
For The Very Young
B1 Zuni Lullaby
B2 Cherokee Lullaby
B3 Picuris* Elf's Song
Prayers
B4 Nez Percé Power Song Of The Eagle
B5 Iroquois Dream Song
B6 Hopi A Song Of The Flute Ceremony
War Songs
B7 Teton Sioux* Clear The Way
B8 Chippewa* Farewell To The Warriors
B9 Chippewa* Song For A Woman Who Was Brave In War
Flute Lure
B10 Sioux Flute Call
B11 Yuchi Lonesome
B12 Chippewa* I Have Found My Lover
B13 Pima Flute Song
Songs For The Dead
B14 Tlingit* Mourning Song For A Brother
B15 Alaskan Eskimo* Inviting-In Dance Song
Singing For A New Life
B16 Arapaho When I Met Him Approaching (Arapaho Ghost Dance)
B17 Delaware* Peyote Song
B18 Chippewa* Methodist Hymn
B19 Kiowa Gourd Dance - With Captured U.S. Army Bugler

Credits

  • Edited By – John Bierhorst

Notes

Songs from this album, transcribed and with native texts, are included in the book A Cry from the Earth: Music of the North American Indians, John Bierhorst, Four Winds Press, 1979.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Label Code: FE-3777 A
  • Label Code: FE-3777 B
  • Matrix / Runout: FC 7777 A
  • Matrix / Runout: FC 7777 B

Other versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
FA 37777, FC 7777 North American Indians* A Cry From The Earth: Music Of The North American Indians ‎(LP) Folkways Records, Folkways Records FA 37777, FC 7777 US 1979
FA 37777 North American Indians* A Cry From The Earth: Music Of The North American Indians ‎(LP) Folkways Records FA 37777 US 1979
FA 37777 North American Indians* A Cry From The Earth: Music Of The North American Indians ‎(LP) Folkways Records FA 37777 US 1979

A Song Of The Wildcat Dance.

The indigenous peoples of the Americas comprise numerous different cultures. Each has its own mythologies. There is no single mythology of the Indigenous North American peoples, but numerous different canons of traditional narratives associated with religion, ethics and beliefs

The term American Indians is defined by the indigenous peoples of the area that is now known as the United States. This means the people were living here for thousands of years, long before it was conquered and settled. Over the last many hundred years, the American Indians have formed tribes, hunted, lived, and prospered on this great land. They were overall a peaceful people who enjoyed family, prayer, and creativity. An appreciation and respect for nature was of the utmost importance.

Plains Music is an album released in 1992 by Manfred Mann's Plain Music, which was a project initiated by Manfred Mann after he retired his Earth Band in the late 80s. "This album is called Plains Music, as it consists mainly of the melodies of the North American Plains Indians. We do not pretend that it is in any sense representative of the original ethnic music which was its source material. I tried to make a simple album of plain music, using as few notes as possible and keeping the tracks short and to the point

The environmental wisdom and spirituality of North American Indians is legendary. Animals were respected as equal in rights to humans. Of course they were hunted, but only for food, and the hunter first asked permission of the animal's spirit. Among the hunter-gatherers the land was owned in common: there was no concept of private property in land, and the idea that it could be bought and sold was repugnant. Perhaps the most famous of all Indian speeches about the environment is the beautiful speech of Chief Seattle of the Squamish tribe of the Pacific Northwest USA. But alas, Seattle's "environmental" speech was written by scriptwriter Ted Perry, in the winter of 1971/72, for a Canadian film on ecology, and attributed to Seattle for aesthetic effect. It is still a brilliant piece of work which distills the essence of many scattered Indian speeches.

North American Indians. This general category includes a selection of more specific topics. Displaying Featured North American Indians Articles. Arikara, North American Plains Indians of the Caddoan linguistic family. Mi’kmaq, the largest of the North American Indian tribes traditionally occupying what are now Canada’s eastern Maritime Provinces (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island) and parts of the present . states of Maine and Massachusetts. Because their Algonquian dialect differed greatl. row. Crow, North American Indians of Siouan linguistic stock, historically affiliated with the village-dwelling Hidatsa of the upper Missouri River

Mortuary Customs of the North American Indians. Folk-Lore and Legends of the North American Indian. American Indian music would normally be studied by an ethnomusicologist rather than a student of folk music. One must rememb er American Indians have had opportunities to borrow riddles (from that the same white or Negro groups from whom they did borrow folktales !). Perhaps Elsie Clews Parsons was correct in explaining the failure of the Micmac Indians to borrow riddles from their French and Negro neighbors and of the Pueblo Indians to borrow riddles from the surrounding Spanish culture to a definite cultural block against metaphor (1925 : 132 ; 1936 : 171). Prayers and Charms The prayers of some American Indians have been investigated. For refer ences to discussions of Crow, Navaho, Winnebago, and.

American Indians - Woodland Tribes & California Indians. Woodland Indian tribes lived east of the Plains Indians and extended from New England and Maryland to the Great Lakes Area and into Maine. They lived in the forests near lakes or streams, which is why they're called Eastern Woodland Indians. Their food, shelter, clothing, weapons and tools came from the forest. The Iroquois, Mound Builders, Algonquian and Shawnee are a few Woodland tribes. When someone in a Woodland tribe died, the tribe would hold a cry ceremony. The chief sang and danced around the fire. This ceremony lasted for five days. The day before it started, five knots were tied in a piece of milkweed. Every day of the ceremony they untied a knot. Face paint was a big deal to Woodland Indians.

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